Subba’s Serendipitous moments

October 26, 2010

Ray Ozzie’s new memo to Microsoft

Filed under: Business,Model,Strategy — Subbaraman Iyer @ 3:58 pm
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Ray Ozzie is a legend. Bill Gates rated him as one of the five best programmers in the world. Ray created Lotus Notes – the popular email and collaborative workspace solutions in the world. Ray succeeded Bill Gates as the Chief Software Architect when Bill decided to leave Microsoft. He is truly a visionary and I had found his earlier memo The Internet services disruption very interesting

Now as Ray prepares to leave Microsoft, he has penned a farewell memo titled Dawn of a new Day. It makes interested reading as he explains several new shifts about where the “post PC world” is headed.

When I read both the memos I get a feeling that despite the 5 years that he spent there and his exhortation for changing, he hasn’t been effective enough. After his routine praise of Microsoft, he makes a subtle but pointed criticism of Microsoft’s business model when he says:

Yet, for all our great progress, some of the opportunities I laid out in my memo five years ago remain elusive and are yet to be realized.

Certain of our competitors’ products and their rapid advancement & refinement of new usage scenarios have been quite noteworthy. Our early and clear vision notwithstanding, their execution has surpassed our own in mobile experiences, in the seamless fusion of hardware & software & services, and in social networking & myriad new forms of internet-centric social interaction.

There is also a veiled pointer to Microsoft’s seemingly glaring weakness of not being able to conceive the future when he says:

In our industry, if you can imagine something, you can build it.  We at Microsoft know from our common past – even the past five years – that if we know what needs to be done, and if we act decisively, any challenge can be transformed into a significant opportunity.  And so, the first step for each of us is to imagine fearlessly; to dream.

The one irrefutable truth is that in any large organization, any transformation that is to ‘stick’ must emerge from within.  Those on the outside can strongly influence, particularly with their wallets.  Those above are responsible for developing and articulating a compelling vision, eliminating obstacles, prioritizing resources, and generally setting the stage with a principled approach.

But the power and responsibility to truly effect transformation exists in no small part at the edge.  Within those who, led or inspired, feel personally and collectively motivated to make; to act; to do.

In taking the time to read this, most likely it’s you.

At times, it almost seems that he is endorsing Google’s strategy and technology approach.

August 28, 2010

Will the future search be “social” or “action”?

Filed under: Business,Innovation,Perspective — Subbaraman Iyer @ 12:15 pm
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The world of search is clearly at an inflexion point. Google has dominated search for so long that it has become synonymous with search.

Yet the search world will be transformed in a radical way even before we realize it. Social search powered by Facebook will be a reality because of social plug-ins. I have absolutely no doubts on that account and wrote about its impact in my blog post here.

There is another aspect of vertical search which surprisingly was ushered in by Microsoft’s Bing. However Google seems to be muscling its way here with its recent acquisitions like ITA software. I think this will be a bigger market and it remains to be seen how Google will integrate the vertical search into its current offerings. This will be an interesting development to watch.

“Action” search will perhaps be a new phenomenon. Esther Dyson in a very thought provoking piece describes the need for action search. I was surprised to learn that “action search” was actually an idea that Bill Gates proposed when he said  “The future of search is verbs.” But he said it at a private dinner and it never spread. How did Microsoft miss this profound idea? This as Esther beautifully describes  represents the world more accurately. And that means better, more meaningful responses when we search.

August 17, 2010

Google wants to find the next winner in search – Maybe Search 2.0!

Over the weekend, the Wall Street Journal published an interesting interview with Eric Schmidt – CEO of Google and a great tech visionary. Disclosure: I am a great admirer of Eric Schmidt.

The interview comes at an interesting juncture when Android seems to be on a roll powering 200,000 devices a daily and slated to be the dominant operating system on the mobile platform. Yet, of late, the media has been critical of Google, probably taking the cue from a weak stock price. Add to that the mindshare belongs now to Facebook.

Notwithstanding the negative media reports on Google, Eric in this interview shares several new insights about where Google is headed. Some of his insights and quotes are interesting:

Asked to comment on Android being given free as compared to the fat margins made by Apple he says:

"You get a billion people doing something, there’s lots of ways to make money. Absolutely, trust me. We’ll get lots of money for it."

"In general in technology," he says, "if you own a platform that’s valuable, you can monetize it." Example: Google is obliged to share with Apple search revenue generated by iPhone users. On Android, Google gets to keep 100%.”

That difference alone, says Mr. Schmidt, is more than enough to foot the bill for Android’s continued development.

Google’s real challenge though it dominates the search business:

The real challenge is one not yet on most investors’ minds: how to preserve Google’s franchise in Web advertising, the source of almost all its profits, when "search" is outmoded.

The day is coming when the Google search box—and the activity known as Googling—no longer will be at the center of our online lives. Then what? "We’re trying to figure out what the future of search is."

Now that’s what being visionary is all about – not reacting to Wall Street but figuring out the future before Wall Street has had the chance to position you. Maybe he’s taking the cue from Andy Grove’s philosophy of Only the paranoid survive.

 Google’s intriguing aspect of Search 2.0 can be summed neatly as he says:

"We know roughly who you are, roughly what you care about, roughly who your friends are." Google also knows, to within a foot, where you are.

Mr. Schmidt leaves it to a listener to imagine the possibilities of this social search and what its implications could be. In fact, Google is acutely aware that we are on the cusp of a new phenomenon called “Social search” which may be powered by the Facebook phenomena.

Google the creator of targeted advertising believes that it will dominate the category raises the bar:

"The power of individual targeting—the technology will be so good it will be very hard for people to watch or consume something that has not in some sense been tailored for them."

Finally, Eric presents the most intriguing and scary possibility of the future when he says:

"I don’t believe society understands what happens when everything is available, knowable and recorded by everyone all the time," he says. He predicts, apparently seriously, that every young person one day will be entitled automatically to change his or her name on reaching adulthood in order to disown youthful hijinks stored on their friends’ social media sites.

"I mean we really have to think about these things as a society," he adds. "I’m not even talking about the really terrible stuff, terrorism and access to evil things."

April 22, 2010

Twitter’s cruel irony

Filed under: Business,India,Learning — Subbaraman Iyer @ 2:52 pm
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In the media frenzy world that we all live in, Twitter has suddenly taken center stage, especially in India.

Twitter came into its own during the Mumbai 26/11 terrorist attacks when it even upstaged the mainstream media. Now the irony is that India’s best twitter – Shashi Tharoor (with over 750,000 followers) had to resign as Minister of State for Foreign Affairs had to quit in ignominy in a scandal which had the potent mix of cricket, illicit romance, politics and of course money. All of it triggered by a rival’s tweet (Lalit Modi commissioner of IPL).

The saying goes: “Those who live by the sword, perish by it.” Lalit Modi himself who conceived the IPL and generated more than $4 billion in revenues in just 2 years got a taste of his own medicine, when a tweet by Shashi Tharoor had the tax authorities making one of their biggest investigations against him and all his partners.

That Lalit Modi is now toast is a foregone conclusion. Worse things await him based on all the news stories that’s breaking out every moment.

It all happened because two egoistic, pompous, publicity seeking and twitter addicts were stupid to tweet in the middle of the night and wake up the whole world. Had they not done so, the party would have gone on.

A fine instance of the law of unintended consequences.

Facebook wants to be the Internet

Filed under: Business,Competition,Leadership,Strategy — Subbaraman Iyer @ 12:01 pm
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Facebook’s f8 conference yesterday is a significant event. The Facebook juggernaut seems unstoppable. It will go down in history when Facebook revealed its intent to revolutionize not just the Internet, but act as the default Internet.

Facebook launched 3 major “features”, all of which may seem pretty much innocuous but that could have a dramatic and profound impact. Though I had referred to some of the implications in my talk on How Facebook will impact us and Why CIOs should meet the Facebook at the CIO conference in Singapore, I didn’t expect it would come to us so soon.

Becoming social is default: Facebook repackaged the Social graph as Open graph. With this it is not only possible to see social connections between people, but also connect people with the interests – be it books, movies, places, brands and the list is endless. As Mark Zuckerberg  said: “The web can can become a series of personally and semantically meaningful connections”. There’s nothing more sticky in the world than a Social graph.

This will surely accelerate the move to search becoming more social. I am quite sure that the “social search” phenomenon will be something that will gain preference over the normal search in many product categories. Businesses and brands will perhaps consider shifting marketing campaigns to leverage this in lieu of the traditional web page.

As a corollary, the Web which has been defined by hyperlinks (which Google exploited to its advantage), will gradually morph into social connections – with likes, dislikes, interests, behavioral patterns etc. that could become increasingly machine readable and all social interactions get assembled in a large database which Facebook can exploit.

Social plugins:The social plugins may be viewed as mere widgets, but again the impact is far reaching. The LIKE button offers not just “instant personalization” but enables to create a persistent and continuous relationship with the entity – be it a book, music album, food, almost anything. It feeds into the Open graph seamlessly. Any user who searches for the book will immediately bring it to the Open graph from Facebook’s search engine and with another click can take it to any book site.

Mark mentioned in his address that he expects to have 1 billion LIKES within 24 hours of the launch.  Quite possible given that Facebook now has over 30 major partners like CNN, ESPN, IMDb and others. With about 30 billion LIKES a month, in addition to over over 25 billion shares a month (without LIKES), Facebook will become the largest sharing site in the world.

The social plugins will be the much needed catalyst for viral marketing or buzz marketing. Nothing else comes close. It will take a while before marketers learn to exploit this, but the tools are already there.

There are other features targeted a t developers and its implications will become clearer soon.

Other interesting developments:

Growing numbers:Facebook is approaching 500 million subscribers and close to 100 million subscribers access this through the mobile. In fact my view is that the killer application for the smartphone is Facebook quite serendipitiously. The Facebook Connect itself has close to 100 million. With the social plugins and open graph, Facebook Connect has become unassailable.

Microsoft alliance:One clear application that may not strictly qualify as social plugin, could be Microsoft’s Docs.com which enables users to share, edit, view web based documents with their Facebook’s friends. Obviously this is a frontal attack on Google Docs.

The implications of Facebook’s initiatives promise both unparalleled benefit and great risk depending on one’s worldview. While on the one hand it will make sharing and connecting a snap, it will enable Facebook to own every activity on the Internet. If people were scared of Google’s power and influence, Facebook takes this fear to new heights – it will become the Web itself from the big glue that tied the Web itself.

In that role, Facebook will have to be the most trusted entity in the world. It is awesome but on second thoughts leaves me scared.

February 10, 2010

Google puts Buzz in the Gmail

Filed under: Business,Competition,Strategy — Subbaraman Iyer @ 11:47 am
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Google woke up to the Facebook and the Twitter challenge. Finally.

Google Buzz is the latest product from the Google family and its best attempt to build a social network after the early attempts like Orkut and Open Social saw marginal success.

To me Google Buzz looks like FriendFeed 2.0 (Facebook acquired FriendFeed last year) with its stream of updates, pictures, links from one’s friends. The biggest advantage that Google has in launching Buzz is that this is built into the Gmail application which already has over 175 million users. And Buzz is available on the iPhone and the Android as well.

Google is giving a lot of granular controls but the default social graph is based on the Gmail settings (mail recipients and senders of mail). Whether they indeed are actually the desired social graph for someone is something that I am not sure. For me, it surely is not!

Will Google win against Twitter with the Buzz? Twitter is simple and the tweets go to all the people who follow the tweet sender. “Buzzing” is not. There is a public and private buzz and this could make it complicated.

At first glance Google Buzz has a few advantages: It combines the best from Twitter, FriendFeed, Facebook Connect, Flickr and a few others. It has nice email integration as they show up in the Inbox and as a tab within Gmail. It highlights items that friends like and share. You can read about the functionality here

The key challenge is how will Google square off against Facebook when Facebook introduces email. And whether Google Buzz will integrate with Facebook connect.

That will be interesting to watch!

August 11, 2009

Mobile phones serve as catalysts for social media.

The mobile data services market is on an unprecedented roll. For the first time, wireless data revenue in the U.S. passed $10 billion in Q1 2009. Wireless data revenue in the U.S. itself maybe $42 billion by 2009 as per the respected analyst — Chetan Sharma who has provided details in his market update. The U.S. is now is the largest mobile data market, ahead of Japan and China. Verizon’s data revenues are close to $4 billion, just shy of NTT DoCoMo’s. The top four U.S. carriers figure among the top 10 global operators by way of mobile data service revenues.

I was curious to find out what could have led to the phenomenal surge. While there could be a few factors, in my view the single largest contributor has been the growth of social media. Let me explain:

As more and more people sign on to social networking platforms like Facebook, there is a compelling desire to share and be part of the communication. This naturally implies that more people are signing up for the mobile data plans which are far more profitable for operators. The key catalyst that contributes both to the social media and to the operator’s profit pool happens to be the ubiquitous mobile phone.

A simple, easy to use browser and a good camera on the phone is all that is needed. When the smart phone was invented, I bet no one saw this as a potential application. The iPhone showed what is possible and soon a variety of devices has made access to social media quite easy.

Now, mobile operators for a long time have tried to offer a variety of applications, but barring a few none took off. This only goes to show that managing a network and managing a application portfolio calls for different competencies. And suddenly when one was least expecting, there’s a big surge in mobile data services.

INQ Mobile — owned by Hutchinson Whampoa has launched a Facebook phone. In Hong Kong, where the INQ1 launched back in March, nearly 50 percent of its owners regularly use data services on a level that is four times higher than the typical 3G user base. Facebook usage is also 3-4 times higher than the average on other 3G devices on the 3 Hong Kong network, the company said. Soon we may have a Twitter phone as well.

So, we are back to where it all started: Carriers have become dumb pipes and the innovation is happening around the ends of the pipes — at the device level and at the application level.

So, like I normally say about innovation, the unintended effects of an innovation caused by seemingly disparate tributaries often causes a flood in an area that we least expected to happen.

July 1, 2009

Social network for Government 2.0

Government 2.0 is clearly gaining momentum. I just stumbled on a social network platform to discuss government 2.0 initatives. GovLoop is the Premier Social Network for Government 2.0 connecting over 12,500 Federal, State, Local, Academics, and Good Contractors.

This is what I call tapping the wisdom of the crowd something that I have been strongly advocating. Some prefer to call it crowdsourcing.

The U.S. Government’s dashboard — Elegant and simple

After Vivek Kundra launched the open access to U.S. government data he has now launched a new U.S. government dashboard that tracks the U.S. government spending.. This tracks government spending with charts and lists ranking the largest government contractors (Lockheed, Boeing, Northrop Grumman, etc.) and assistance recipients (Department of Healthcare Services, New York State Dept. of Health, Texas Health & Human Services Commission, etc.). Well, the site design is neat, user friendly but what took my breath away was the way the various trends that were displayed. Certainly they got inspired from gapminder.

This site has been built on Drupal– a open source content management software.

This clearly shows that the U.S. leads in transparency and even the Governments can innovate if they have the right leadership.

I strongly suggest all the Government CIOs visit the site.

Which other government will follow next?

Australia launches Gov 2.0. Will Singapore follow?

Another major country with pronounced democratic traditions and openness has set up a Government 2.0 task force. They rightly describe the opportunities that current technology provides, The current change in media behavior and habits is again seen as an opportunity not as a threat. The enthusiasm is clearly visible and the charter for the task force is clearly ambitious and could serve as an inspiration to other governments.

Many of the points made resonate strongly with me and I have written about it here and here. I only hope that Singapore also embraces this and does it soon.

I call it the inevitable path, because if people in government don’t wake up, the citizens will find some methods of forcing it to happen.

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