Subba’s Serendipitous moments

September 23, 2009

Dell seeks growth in Perot Systems

Dell made a surprise announcement to acquire Perot systems for close to $4 billion. Perot Systems in a IT services firms, predominantly US centric with government and the health care verticals accounting for over 70% of its revenues. By acquiring Perot Systems, Dell is just trying to follow the footsteps of IBM and HP by being a player in the IT services organization.

In my view, this is not a great step for Dell and I am disappointed. Here are the pros and cons:

Vertical presence: Perot Systems may have a great presence in the U.S. government and healthcare but outside of these verticals and outside U.S. it is a very marginal player. The healthcare sector may see some headwind thanks to the impeding reforms but the healthcare sector has been slow to innovate and have less appetite for new IT technology and services.

Margins: First Perot Systems doesn’t have great margins; in fact its margins are lower than industry standards and the last 6 months the results have been disappointing. For the 6 months ending June 2009, Perot made $59 million on a sales of $1.3 billion, which translates to a net margin of just 4.5%. Last year Perot Systems earned $117 million on sales of $2.8 billion.

Synergy: It is likely that Dell’s plan is to use Perot Systems to undertake IT services within its enterprise customers. This looks tough, as both the organizations have a different sales/engagement model. There is no significant synergy, and no integration issues as well. Dell is a $60 billion business and the Perot IT services business is relatively insignificant.

Strategic fit: While the acquisition gives Dell a services outfit, it is unlikely to be a strong strategic fit. Dell’s competencies are in supply chain, direct marketing, agility to respond and being able to sell volume products. The services business is an entirely different kettle of fish and the verticals where Perot is strong — the government and the healthcare are not noted for being agile. How this acquisition could become the “anchor” acquisition for IT services is difficult for me to understand unless Dell is planning on a roll up strategy to acquire other IT services firms.

With this step Dell also seems to be going on a different path. All trends and figures indicate that Dell’s position is becoming difficult with new areas like cloud computing, SaaS and other developments. Dell needs to bolster its offerings in that space to contend with the likes of Cisco and IBM and the Oracle-Sun combination as all of them are beefing up their offerings on the server space.

A strong product focused organization with its unique DNA and specifically strong organization culture will have to contend with several hiccups to make sense of this acquisition. IBM, HP and other It services organizations are unlikely to be impacted.

September 20, 2009

U.S. Federal government to use the cloud and the App Store

Vivek Kundra — the Federal CIO and who is actively promoting the innovation agenda announced Apps.Gov. It includes a variety of business applications, hosting and social applications all housed in a cloud.

All the federal agencies will be able to buy the cloud computing applications and services and this will surely bring the cost of IT services in the federal budget. It is also a very innovative way of standardizing applications.

What Apps.Gov also ensures is that the government enjoys the same benefits that technology changes and pricing models have to offer to the consumer. The government also can reduce the cost of IT infrastructure like building data centers a, servers, storage. Some applications may even be free.

I do not know how he is going to handle the privacy and security issues, but I guess given the size of the federal IT budget, many vendors will come forward to build the standards needed for the Government to be their customer. Google has already responded by announcing that it would dedicate a part of its computing infrastructure to serve the federal government.

Sure, other vendors will follow.

All in all, this is a great initiative and something that other Governments should also consider.

How to find meaning?

Last week as I was involved in a deep discussion with a good friend of mine, (I also happened to coach him in a difficult professional transition) I had an epiphany. He asked me whether I found the meaning of life.

The question was sudden without any preamble and as he looked deeply in my eyes, I discovered that I have been in a similar quest perhaps all my life. I only don’t know whether I have finished finding the meaning of my own existence.

Meaning is not something that you find as you normally try to find a location in a map. It is not something that you look for as you would for an item in a supermarket.

It is something that one has to build in one’s life. The elements to build it is already there in one’s consciousness. It is built out of one’s own past, out of one’s own talent and aspirations for oneself. It is based on the values that one has developed and what one stand for. It is based on the things that one believes in and out of the things that one cares about in a deep sense.

Now, each of us have to take the elements and combine that into a unique pattern that will resonate with oneself. The discovery of that unique pattern could take years. Once discovered, it becomes precious.

Meaning guides a person and sometimes becomes the raison d’être for one’s existence. It is nourishing and provides the dignity to one’s life.

I also discovered a strange connection between the outcomes of events and the meaning of life. A material success which doesn’t resonate with the meaning in one’s life seems hollow, superficial and doesn’t give much joy. A success that’s congruent with one’s meaning in life gives fulfillment.

Has anyone else found meaning of life? How did you all find it?

I would be curious to know.

September 10, 2009

Steve Jobs with a new liver and astounding numbers.

Steve is back with a new liver. He’s back and his unexpected presence at the Apple event got him a long standing ovation. He mentioned that he now had the liver of a person in their mid-20s who died in a car crash. He talked about the significance of organ donation. He ended by telling everyone to think about organ donation, as it saved his life.

That’s wonderful Steve. But would you create a charity organization for organ failures, do something to encourage more organ donation and set an example. When can we see Steve the philanthropist?

That way Steve you would have put your wealth, creativity, charisma and presence to a great cause.

Steve went on to mention Apple’s great successes:

iPhone:

30 million iPhone have now been sold worldwide in a little over 2 years.

There are now over 75,000 apps in the App Store

There have now been some 1.8 billion App Store downloads

The 3.1 update for iPhone and iPod touch will launch today.

iTunes:

     iTunes is now the #1 music retailer in the world

     8.5 billion songs have been downloaded from iTunes

  There are now 100 M accounts on iTunes, making it one of the largest stores on the web

     iTunes 9 is launching today, with a revamped look and feel

     An easier way to organize apps on the iPhone and iPod touch

     iTunes LPs (this is the “Cocktail” feature)

iPod:

     Apple has sold over 220 million iPods to date

     It’s one of the most successful products in history

     In the U.S., the iPod has 73.8% market share

     The next biggest MP3 player is “other” with 18%

     “Microsoft pulling in the rear with just about 1%”

     There have been over 20 million iPod touches sold.

     So combined that’s 50 million iPhones and iPod touches.

     21,178 games and entertainment titles in the App Store now

     Compare that to 3,680 on the Nintendo DS and 607 on the Sony PSP

Amazing mind blowing results and again Steve at this best !

September 3, 2009

Broadband stagnates, mobile surges in India

Filed under: Business,India — Subbaraman Iyer @ 10:02 pm
Tags: , , , ,

Based on recently released data, India’s broadband penetration and growth rates are really pathetic. As per the TRAI website, the subscriber base as of July 2009 is only 6.8 million. Incidentally any connectivity of speeds at 256kbs and higher is considered broadband in India.

Now India has 5 large telecom players — Bharti, Reliance, Tata Communications, BSNL and MTNL. Yet somehow broadband doesn’t seem to figure prominently in their plans.

The mobile penetration continues to surge. India now has about 400 million subscribers though the ARPU levels are at about U.S.$ 5 or so. The mobile voice calls are the cheapest in the planet and the data market is poised to grow healthily at about 30% per annum.

Despite the low penetration of broadband activity in India, the internet activity seems vibrant as can be seen here.

September 1, 2009

At Telstra you get a bonus for delayed IT projects

Welcome to the Telstra’s compensation model.

Greg Winn, the Sol Trujillo-appointed chief operating officer of Telstra until February 2009, was paid a bonus of $2.2 million for outcomes related to the delivery of the carrier’s IT transformation, which has since been revealed to be running $200 million over budget. Read the details here.

What’s interesting is that despite it running over $200 million over budget ( the project was supposed to save $100 million a year in IT expenses), the CIO feels satisfied that many of the objectives of the five year transformation was achieved.

David Thodey — the Telstra’s CEO believes a $200 million overspend should be considered a good result, considering the awful experiences other industries have had attempting an IT transformation.

“I do not know of a better IT transformation,” he said. “I’ve never seen a transformation come in that well.”

I am wondering if this is Telstra’s compensation policy and if I can get a job there. I am also curious to study Telstra’s goal setting methods, budgeting process and their compensation model.

Last year, I was advising a IT services firm on the strategy approach to managing a business transformation program for one of their clients. Knowing the risk of such a program and the various dependencies, there was a discussion of how the compensation structure for the team should be built. While I didn’t have a hand at making the final recommendation, the consensus was that the bonus scheme should be weighted in favor of the benefits realization proposition. Benefits in this case was actual cost savings and hence the cost savings need to be computed, independently verified, communicated to the client who has to accept it. Only then could the bonuses be paid.

Ironically, the IT services firm has Telstra as one of their large accounts. I hope they don’t adopt the Telstra model.

Wikipedia wrestles with a growth and direction dilemma

Wikipedia has been an unqualified success of this decade. It is just not the product but the way they have created it. They spawned a new ideology, a new culture. In fact several enterprises have started to develop their content management and even the knowledge management practices around a wiki model.

However Wikipedia itself faces a deep dilemma about its growth and direction.

It started off as an encyclopedia from voluntary contributors and complete freedom to improve the content. Now, in its latest announcement it will impose an editorial review on articles. So, now the notion that everyone can change the entries is no longer true. In my view this is inevitable. A great ability to influence has to be accompanied by an equal amount of responsibility.

Currently they are doing a review about their culture and growth direction. I am particularly pleased that they are doing that because one of their commitments was to give a free encyclopedia to the world in possibly every language. They clearly seem to have lost sight of that.

The interesting thing is that Jimmy Wales — the man who created this movement and now an iconic figure is most critical about the direction itself.

Unlike corporations, Wikipedia is run by a Foundation which means that they have followers wedded to a particular cause. Changing the growth trajectory is not simply a matter of a CEO or the Board making a decision, but they would need to carry the thousands of volunteers with them — no easy task.

This would be an interesting organizational change to watch and learn from.

Microsoft Windows under siege.

Operating systems wars have been skirmishes. They haven’t produced any major upsets. Microsoft dominates the OS completely and despite the Linux aficionados, Microsoft’s strong hold remained unchallenged especially at the low to medium end servers and in desktops. It is a different story in the mobile space though.

But things are slowly changing and my sense is that in the next couple of years, Microsoft will face more heat compared to anything that it has ever faced on the server front.

Microsoft will have to increasingly contend with VMWare which has bolstered its arsenal with its acquisition of Springsource – maker of open-source software development tools which can analyze and optimize the application performance. This could allow VMWare to undermine the Windows operating system.

Despite all the talk about the huge growth of virtualization, the untapped market is still large. Currently virtualization has been done mostly at the data centers (which is where the complexity is and where the cost savings are) and even there the current estimate is that less than 25% of the servers are virtualized. This creates a big opportunity. It is no surprise that Cisco wants a piece of this market and it is targeting them with its Unified Computing system.

Well, there’s a desktop market and a notebook market and it will require a different approach to tackle this market. Currently the focus seems to be on the servers.

Microsoft cannot afford to ignore this market. In fact it announced Hyper V Virtual machine as part of its Windows Server 2008 and it is likely that it will offer several enhancements in time to come. Moreover, Microsoft can afford to give its Hyper V free. With other contenders like Citrix Xen, Virtual Iron remaining in the fringes, it is going to be a battle between Microsoft and VMWare. And again, this battle is not just one of functionality or product features, but increasingly fought on a business model.

In some way, it could very well resemble the browser wars of the nineties.

But from Microsoft’s standpoint the battle for the OS has another contender. Google with its web based software for office and productivity applications is also undermining the Windows operating system.

The early impact on Microsoft is here to see. However it is too early to announce the demise of Windows.

So, the skirmishes are over and the battle is being fought on many fronts.

August 20, 2009

How to build a successful innovation team?

Recently I delivered a talk on business innovation. My main thesis was why that offers a competitive advantage and offers the best barrier to entry. There were interesting questions, but the question that flummoxed me was asked by a young MBA student and it went as follows: How to build a successful innovation team?

Not having worked in R&D or an innovation team, I had to admit my ignorance. I promised that I will think about it and revert. I asked several HR managers, consultants and even some innovation experts. I was not satisfied with most of the responses because they talked about examining past track records, achievements and so on. That doesn’t say much and I don’t necessarily agree with experience being a true predictor.. So here’s what I have come up with:

  • Hire someone who doesn’t care much for stability, hierarchy, order and predictability. Every problem is unique and will need a different thinking approach.
  • Find someone who appreciates and thrives on ambiguity. Ambiguity often has negative connotations, but to me to be able to appreciate the grey area and to live in the mental conflict zone is key to finding the breakthrough.
  • A deep competency is good, but the person should be genuinely interested in other things. It is when you are looking at something else with genuine interest, a serendipity play converts the competency to a breakthrough.
  • Have the ability to “abstractize” a practical problem and see a practical problem and hence an opportunity in an abstract thought. This calls for people who can have their feet on the ground and the head in the cloud and span the space between them.
  • Finally and I think this is the most important: The last thing a team needs is finding another clone. Stop looking for something similar to what you already have. You need to fill gaps that are in your team and complement the competency and hence the more of the same doesn’t always make it successful.

(I am assuming that there exists some amount of passion, enthusiasm, respect for people and inter-personal communication strengths.)

It would be difficult to expect all this in an individual. However collectively the team should have these qualities. Whether they become successful or not is a different question. It depends on the mindset and a whole range of factors. But at least you know that we have a good capable team of cracking a problem.

Does anyone have a competency model to build innovation teams?

August 11, 2009

Mobile phones serve as catalysts for social media.

The mobile data services market is on an unprecedented roll. For the first time, wireless data revenue in the U.S. passed $10 billion in Q1 2009. Wireless data revenue in the U.S. itself maybe $42 billion by 2009 as per the respected analyst — Chetan Sharma who has provided details in his market update. The U.S. is now is the largest mobile data market, ahead of Japan and China. Verizon’s data revenues are close to $4 billion, just shy of NTT DoCoMo’s. The top four U.S. carriers figure among the top 10 global operators by way of mobile data service revenues.

I was curious to find out what could have led to the phenomenal surge. While there could be a few factors, in my view the single largest contributor has been the growth of social media. Let me explain:

As more and more people sign on to social networking platforms like Facebook, there is a compelling desire to share and be part of the communication. This naturally implies that more people are signing up for the mobile data plans which are far more profitable for operators. The key catalyst that contributes both to the social media and to the operator’s profit pool happens to be the ubiquitous mobile phone.

A simple, easy to use browser and a good camera on the phone is all that is needed. When the smart phone was invented, I bet no one saw this as a potential application. The iPhone showed what is possible and soon a variety of devices has made access to social media quite easy.

Now, mobile operators for a long time have tried to offer a variety of applications, but barring a few none took off. This only goes to show that managing a network and managing a application portfolio calls for different competencies. And suddenly when one was least expecting, there’s a big surge in mobile data services.

INQ Mobile — owned by Hutchinson Whampoa has launched a Facebook phone. In Hong Kong, where the INQ1 launched back in March, nearly 50 percent of its owners regularly use data services on a level that is four times higher than the typical 3G user base. Facebook usage is also 3-4 times higher than the average on other 3G devices on the 3 Hong Kong network, the company said. Soon we may have a Twitter phone as well.

So, we are back to where it all started: Carriers have become dumb pipes and the innovation is happening around the ends of the pipes — at the device level and at the application level.

So, like I normally say about innovation, the unintended effects of an innovation caused by seemingly disparate tributaries often causes a flood in an area that we least expected to happen.

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