Subba’s Serendipitous moments

July 15, 2010

Facebook addiction

Filed under: Blogroll,Perspective — Subbaraman Iyer @ 3:20 pm
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The 76-year-old woman walked down the hallway of Clearview Addictions
Clinic, searching for the right department. She passed signs for the
"Heroin Addiction Department (HAD)," the "Smoking Addiction Department
(SAD)" and the "Bingo Addiction Department (BAD)." Then she spotted
the department she was looking for: "Facebook Addiction Department
(FAD)."

It was the busiest department in the clinic, with about three dozen
people filling the waiting room, most of them staring blankly into
their Blackberries and iPhones. A middle-aged man with unkempt hair
was pacing the room, muttering, "I need to milk my cows. I need to
milk my cows."

A twenty-something man was prone on the floor, his face buried in his
hands, while a curly-haired woman comforted him.
"Don’t worry. It’ll be all right."
"I just don’t understand it. I thought my update was LOL-worthy, but
none of my friends even clicked the ‘like’
button."
"How long has it been?"
"Almost five minutes. That’s like five months in the real world."

The 76-year-old woman waited until her name was called, then followed
the receptionist into the office of Alfred Zulu, Facebook Addiction
Counselor.

"Please have a seat, Edna," he said with a warm smile. "And tell me
how it all started."
"Well, it’s all my grandson’s fault. He sent me an invitation to join
Facebook. I had never heard of Facebook before, but I thought it was
something for me, because I usually have my face in a book."
"How soon were you hooked?"
"Faster than you can say ‘create a profile.’ I found myself on
Facebook at least eight times each day — and more times at night.
Sometimes I’d wake up in the middle of the night to check it, just in
case there was an update from one of my new friends in India. My
husband didn’t like that. He said that friendship is a precious thing
and should never be outsourced."

"What do you like most about Facebook?"
"It makes me feel like I have a life. In the real world, I have only
five or six friends, but on Facebook, I have 674.
I’m even friends with Juan Carlos Montoya."
"Who’s he?"
"I don’t know, but he’s got 4,000 friends, so he must be famous."
"Facebook has helped you make some connections, I see."
"Oh yes. I’ve even connected with some of the gals from high school —
I still call them ‘gals.’ I hadn’t heard from some of them in ages, so
it was exciting to look at their profiles and figure out who’s
retired, who’s still working, and who’s had some work done. I love
browsing their photos and reading their updates. I know where they’ve
been on vacation, which movies they’ve watched, and whether they hang
their toilet paper over or under. I’ve also been playing a game with
some of them."
"Let me guess. Farmville?"
"No, Mafia Wars. I’m a Hitman. No one messes with Edna."
"Wouldn’t you rather meet some of your friends in person?"
"No, not really. It’s so much easier on Facebook. We don’t need to
gussy ourselves up. We don’t need to take baths or wear perfume or use
mouthwash. That’s the best thing about Facebook — you can’t smell
anyone. Everyone is attractive, because everyone has picked a good
profile pic. One of the gals is using a profile pic that was taken,
I’m pretty certain, during the Eisenhower Administration. "

"What pic are you using?"
"Well, I spent five hours searching for a profile pic, but couldn’t
find one I really liked. So I decided to visit the local beauty
salon."
"To make yourself look prettier?"
"No, to take a pic of one of the young ladies there. That’s what I’m using."
"Didn’t your friends notice that you look different?"
"Some of them did, but I just told them I’ve been doing lots of yoga."
"When did you realize that your Facebooking might be a problem?"
"I realized it last Sunday night, when I was on Facebook and saw a
message on my wall from my husband: ‘I moved out of the house five
days ago. Just thought you should know.’"
"What did you do?"
"What else? I unfriended him of course!"

April 27, 2008

State of the Business intelligence industry

Dave Hatch writes a good report on the expansion and contraction of the “BI” here.

He mentions three factors that inhibit expansion within the enterprise:

  • A lack of BI skill sets among non-technical business users

  • The inability to integrate data from all sources necessary to meet business needs

  • Poor data quality – end users do not trust the information.

I would add a few more based on my experience in Asia Pacific:

  1. Vendors tend to pitch solutions to buyers than to end users.

  2. There is often a big disconnect between IT and end users in terms of what BI applications to target. In most organizations BI tools often end up as mere reporting applications.

  3. End users often have little understanding of the analysis that they need that would enable them to do strategic planning. Barring the CFO community where the budgeting and consolidation process is often well defined, other functional areas rarely have a well considered view of the role of analytics as applicable to their functions.

  4. Many BI projects have failed to produce the necessary business outcomes and hence there is some kind of skepticism. This explains why despite BI being high on the priority list of CIOs, the actual usage has stagnated, something that you confirm.

I have long held the view that for BI to succeed, the vendor community has to invest in more awareness, education and process know how with users. Given that the BI industry has consolidated with Oracle’s acquisition of Hyperion, SAP’s acquisition of Business Objects and IBM’s acquisition of Cognos, (3 of the largest pure play BI vendors), this is unlikely to happen. These large software vendors are likely to bundle BI as part of their overall applications strategy, which could give users a standard template driven packages, but enterprises are unlikely to gain significant benefits or competitive advantage, as they have not been part of of the evolution of the analytics mind set within the organization.

David also talks of BI being delivered as a SaaS service. We evaluated its appeal, and found that a lot of standard reporting applications lend themselves to the SaaS model. The moment the analytics applications has to seek data from diverse data sources, organizations have no choice but to go for the on-premise model.

I don’t think that vendors have managed to integrate unstructured information into their BI solutions. Clearly there’s a need and there’s a market opportunity.

I just want to emphasize the fact that it is not often the problem with the BI tool set, it is the inability of end users to devise their analytics frameworks relevant to their organization that is blocking the growth of the BI industry. The vendors haven’t addressed this. They would have to establish a baseline literacy of BI tools and applications, and ensure more effective implementation, rather than merely focusing on selling standard applications.

The promise of BI is yet to be translated into actual performance. BI technology has no value unless one gains agreement from the users on how it is to be deployed, more so when unstructured data powered by people whose roles and interests vary has to be incorporated. Clearly a major rethink is required.

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